Reviews & Press

Aram

The latest novel by an award-nominated Dales author hopes not only to entertain but solve a real-life murder mystery from the 18th century, writes Graham Chalmers, Weekend Editor of the Harrogate Advertiser.

Aram—Readers' Reviews

Kindle Review 25 June 2017

A truly exceptionally well researched true story written in such a style that I couldn't wait to turn each page. It's my first Amanda Taylor read and I am now on the look out for my next purchase from this superb author. I cannot recommend Amanda Taylor high enough.

By Mylo on 5 Jun. 2017

A great read! I was born in Knaresborough where I still live and could relate to all the places mentioned not only that but I have learnt so much more about its history .
This is the first book that I have read by this author. I am now looking forward to reading her previous ones!

By EllyG on 15 May 2017

Bought for my mum as a present - cannot wait for my copy. The whole family are big fans of this author. Her research is meticulous & her descriptive style brings her books to life. Cannot put the books down - many an unscheduled late night reading!

 

The Vigil of Rain

Dales author Amanda Taylor's latest crime novel continues her knack for telling a cracking story inspired by real history of 100 years ago and more.

An Edwardian murder mystery set in the Yorkshire Wolds, The Vigil of Rain is the final part of Taylor's James Cairn trilogy.

While debut Dangerous Waves saw Cairn, the York barrister, in a murder mystery in Staithes in the year of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee and follow-up Mortimer Blakely is Missing saw him involved in a political crime drama set in late 19th century, The Vigil of Rain opens with Cairn being invited to a grand house party in a traditional Edwardian whodunnit.

Having received praise for her previous books by the likes of Kay Mellor and Gervase Phinn, fans of Taylor's are licking their lips in anticipation.

Published by Jeremy Mills via Northern Heritage Publications,The Vigil of Rain is available now in paperback and on ebook.

Writes Graham Chalmers, Weekend Editor of the Harrogate Advertiser.

 

 

Mortimer Blakely is Missing

'Mortimer Blakely is Missing is a wonderful read.  It is compelling story: gripping, original, accomplished and challenging.'

Gervase Phinn

 

'There's a haunted air to the impressive dust jacket of Amanda Taylor's new historical crime novel.  That ghostly hooded apparition without a face superimposed upon a stormy sky and a menacing sea.  It says danger and intrigue and mystery.'

Graham Chalmers, Weekend Editor of the Harrogate Advertiser.

 

Mortimer Blakely is Missing has hit the high road and was Scotland's Press and Journal book of the week on the 5 July, 2014.

 

 

 

Dangerous Waves (A new and perfected version of The Chinaman's Bastard)

'Dangerous Waves is both clever and moving; a tremendous mystery with twists and turns that will keep you gripped until the final page. I couldn't put it down.'

Kay Mellor

 

The Northern Echo is the first newspaper to coin the heading that Dangerous Waves is MAKING WAVES.

 

HISTORICAL NOVEL SOCIETY

Dangerous Waves

BY AMANDA TAYLOR

Dangerous Waves was originally published under the title The Chinaman’s Bastard in August 2009 but has been revisited by the author, substantially revised, re-edited and republished. It is a great read by an excellent crime writer, and it has certainly been well-researched; both the court drama and the descriptions of Yorkshire bring the novel alive. A real sense of time and place is created; Staithes in 1897 is a great backdrop to the story. The characters are well developed; from the naïve, childlike Daniel to the professional barrister James Cairn, individual personalities come through.

It has a great pace, and the reader is placed headlong into the story from the first page. The language is suitable for the era, and it reads easily with well-written, concise dialogue and vivid descriptions. The chapters are not too long and help build up the tension. The plot keeps the reader guessing, starting with a dead body washed up on the rocks, and the twists and turns add drama, making it engaging and compelling.

This is a good read for historical and crime fans. It is set in an area I know well, but if I didn’t I would love to visit. I look forward to the next book in the series, Mortimer Blakely Is Missing.

Review

APPEARED IN 
HNR Issue 68 (May 2014)

REVIEWED BY 
Barbara Goldie

 

Dangerous Waves was featured in The Big Issue in the North, 30 June—6 July, 2014, in a Q & A article between Amanda Taylor and journalist, Ciara Leeming.

 

 

Reviews of Amanda Taylor's First Novel: The Chinaman's Bastard

'This is a truly excellent book and as a first novel it heralds the arrival of a major new crime writer. The background historical and scientific research which went into the writing of this book lifts it above the normal crime novel. As someone familiar with High Court cases, the trial at the end is not only gripping, but entirely true to life. I cannot recommend this novel too highly.'

John M Gold – ex-editor the London Evening News

 

'Harrogate author Amanda Taylor paints a gripping detailed picture of the hard life of Yorkshire fisher folk and police and legal procedure at the end of Victoria's reign.  The climax is a Crown Court murder trial that smacks of Hitchcock at his best and is as arresting as the title of this wonderful page-turner.'

John Lynott – the Yorkshire Evening Post

 

'Set on the Yorkshire coast and in a York courtroom, this novel is replete with details of late 19th-century English coastal and city life.'

Laura Staley – The American Historical Novel Society Online

 

Aram

'Villany is always progressive, and declines from right, step after step.
Eugene Aram, 1759'

 

 

 

 

  

 

The Vigil of Rain

'As things were to turn out it would be a weekend I would never forget, none of us would.'

 

 

 

The Chinaman's bastard

'Tomorrow would be a day of reckoning.  Tomorrow I was determined to find Mortimer Blakely.'

 

 

Dangerous Waves

'Too late – the big wave came, the wave they had all dreaded might come.’